Articles on Literacy and Reading

Following is a description of the articles I have available for reprint. For pricing and other information about the articles described below, please email me at cindy@cindyhudson(dot)com.

Articles on Literacy and Reading

  • Six Reasons to Love Graphic Novels—Graphic novels, books that combine words and illustrations to tell a story, have been exploding in popularity in recent years. While many parents see them as lightweight reading that doesn’t contribute to their kids’ overall literacy skills, educators and graphic novelists say just the opposite may be true. My 797-word article covers what parents should know about graphic novels and why they should be happy when their kids want to read them. An 88-word resource list of places to find titles for all ages is included.
  • Funny Poems Inspire Kids to Read—Funny poems written for children, about things they can relate to, are great at inspiring kids to read. They are especially good for reluctant readers, who may find their short length, kid-friendly topics and silly rhymes attractive.  My article, “Five Ways Funny Poetry Inspires Kids to Read,” lets parents know the benefits of having their kids read poetry as they grow up. In the 778-word article I quote Kenn Nesbitt, a children’s poet who frequently presents at schools around the country. A 155-word resource sidebar is included.
  • Tips on Reading Aloud to Your Child—Studies consistently show that one of the best ways parents can help their children be successful in school and in life is to read to them. When parents read aloud, their children gain better language skills and greater vocabulary as well as other benefits. Yet, even though moms and dads may be aware that reading aloud is good, they may not know about strategies they can use to make the best use of this tool. This 573-word article includes ideas and advice that help make reading aloud fun. A 63-word sidebar lists online resources for literacy.
  • Six Steps to Starting a Mother-Daughter (or Parent-Child) Book Club—I wrote “Six Steps to Starting a Mother-Daughter Book Club” to help moms identify the key issues they can address to get a new group started. This 616-word article has tips for deciding whom to invite, choosing books to read, and more. I’ve also included a bonus 278-word sidebar titled, “Six Can’t Miss Titles to Get Your Book Club Started.”
  • Scary Stories Help Kids Face Fears—Stories from the Brothers Grimm have long been told to children, but parents today may wonder whether scary stories may do more harm than good. In this 495-word article with a 142-word sidebar of book recommendations in two age groups I interview experts who say scary stories play a role in helping kids face their fears and be heroes, but who caution about keeping the books (and movies) age appropriate.
  • Focus on the Fun to Encourage Your Child to Read—Knowing how important it is for kids to read well, it’s sometimes easy for parents to think of reading as a serious pursuit. Yet kids are more likely to read often, and improve their overall literacy, when they have fun with a book. At Mother Daughter Book Club. com I often get asked how to encourage kids to read. The answer is simple: keep it fun. This 624-word article includes 10 tips for parents on how to make reading fun and encourage kids to spend more face time with a book.
  • Bonding Through Books—Mother-daughter book clubs offer so many advantages to both moms and daughters, including the opportunity to forge a closer bond as the daughter grows. This 630-word personal essay talks about the joys of sharing books with you daughter and it comes with a 228-word sidebar with tips on how to start a club.
  • Do It Yourself Summer Reading Program—The benefits of summer reading have been widely proven. While programs at libraries are often available and easy to sign up for, parents may find that getting to the library or motivating their kids with the prizes offered is difficult. To help parents looking for their own way to motivate their kids to read, I’ve written a 543-word article about an easy way to put together a reading game that can be tailored to each individual family. It includes a 169-word sidebar of do’s and don’ts.